EntertainmentNew study provides insight into a psychological phenomenon known...

New study provides insight into a psychological phenomenon known as social hedonic editing

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People prefer to experience an event with friends at the same time, rather than on different days When people are told to imagine an event will happen to them and their friends (for example, winning $100), people prefer that they and their friends experience these events at the same time, rather than on different days. The results of the study published in “Social Psychology and Personality Science” show that this influence stems from the desire for interpersonal relationships. Research on hedonic editors shows that people prefer to separate the gains and losses that happen in life, and are more willing to have multiple events happening on different days rather than on the same day. For example, people would rather receive two fines on different days than two fines on the same day. Similarly, people would rather win two lottery tickets on different occasions than win two lottery tickets on the same day.

But study author Franklin Shaddy and his team wanted to explore whether people would also choose to split the time between the two events when one of the events happened to a friend (for example, if one person wins $50, their friend also wins 50 U.S. dollars). Researchers want to know whether people choose to experience something at the same time with friends to promote social connection and possibly increase happiness. They tested this through a series of experimental studies. A preliminary study found evidence for this theory, showing that most participants prefer to receive surprise messages from celebrities on the same day as their friends, rather than on different days. Also consistent with the researchers’ predictions, another study found that when the pair of events happened to them and their friends (other people), people were more likely to hope that the pair of events happened on the same day instead of just on the same day. Give yourself (self-self) on the same day.

For example, under the self-other condition, a pair of events describes the participant winning $50 in the lottery and their friends winning $100 in the lottery. Under the self-self condition, there are two events that describe the participant winning $50 and then winning another $100. In three different samples, participants who faced events that happened to them and their friends believed that they would feel the happiest when the event happened on the same day and on different days. Compared with the group who was asked about events that only happened to themselves, this group was more likely to choose the same day option. “In this research, we explored social hedonic editing and found that people prefer to integrate (rather than separate) events that happen to themselves and others, both as a whole and relative to events that happen to themselves,” the research Wrote the author.

“Part of the reason this happens is that people want to promote interpersonal relationships through fusion-but only if the event does not have an overwhelming emotional impact.” A follow-up study further found that people are more likely to want to synchronize the time of the event with another person when they like someone than when they don’t like someone. They are also more willing to synchronize events with people who have the same political beliefs as them, rather than with people who do not share their beliefs. In addition, the desire to connect mediates this relationship between political beliefs and the desire to experience events at the same time. These findings are consistent with the author’s view that people choose to synchronize events with others to increase social connection. When an event occurs that someone doesn’t like or wants to be separated from, the desire to increase social connections no longer exists. Therefore, the timing of synchronization events is no longer attractive.

These findings indicate that coordinating activities with others can increase people’s enjoyment of activities. Shaddy and his team pointed out that people are often reluctant to pursue enjoyable activities on their own. However, if they can schedule these activities based on the experience of others, they may be less opposed to enjoying activities alone.

The study is entitled “Social Pleasure Editing: People prefer to experience events at the same time as other people,” and the authors are Franklin Shaddy, Yanping Tu, and Ayelet Fishbach.

Source: Psypost

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